let water flow through our children’s veins

19 02 2018

bring back the forests

bring back the rains

let Kaveri flow





PachaMama rising: HUMANO

7 08 2016

“At first they couldn’t speak to her, she had forgotten her own language… having spent 10 years on another planet, or six months on this Earth, as per our concept of space and time. Suddenly, it all came back to her. She spoke about a magical world, where people lived in harmony, and anything you wanted became real. It helps knowing that other ways of life also exist.” – Alan Stivelman (in Humano)

http://wp.me/sGFWl-home





HOME

29 06 2016

I just returned home.

Flew into London on a Bolivian tailwind in time to witness the extraordinary turn of events that have forever changed the course of history.

For the past year, I have become increasingly preoccupied with the concept of HOME; the way in which we define our borders: our continents, our countries, our communities, our families. It’s hard not to be, given the fact that there are more displaced people living in the world today than ever before in recorded history. The most recent stats coming out of the UN suggest that the number of people forcibly displaced due to war or persecution exceeds 65 million (more that the entire population of Great Britain).

These facts behind the figures simply overwhelm and it can make it difficult to think creatively about how to truly instigate change.

To find an outlet, I do what I always do: I talk to children. For years I’ve been turning to children to help shed light on age-old philosophical questions because they seem to ask the questions we grown-ups have stopped asking ourselves. I believe children return us to Plato. The conversations took place with small groups, all under the age of ten. I gave each child pen and paper and asked them to write down the first word that came to mind after I said, “HOME”.

By and large, most wrote down the words: “family”, “mummy”, “daddy”, or “house”. But when I asked the children to continue writing anything else that came to mind, there were some wonderful surprises: “ice-cream”, “bed-time”, “breakfast”, “carrots”, “football”– lots of pets’ names were listed too.

These wise young people helped me to question what really goes into the creation of a home, particularly the non-physical components. What are the smells, tastes and sounds that provide us with a sense of home? Which memories of HOME do we treasure most, and why do they hold us so tightly? What does it mean to “feel” at home (or not feel at home), irrespective of geography? Is community participation a prerequisite for claiming a sense of home? Is it possible to find a way to truly be at home with oneself? We lose loved ones, we lose our shelter from the storm, and yet we often survive this pain by tapping into a sense of home lodged deep within our ancestral past, or to the earth or to God.

Human life itself is wholly involved in the issue of finding a home, not necessarily a structure made of sturdy permanence, a bed and a roof (as Maslow may have us believe) – but rather a constant search of an essence of home. If it is an essence we pursue, rather than a structure, maybe there is hope beyond the limits of infrastructure, ways in which we can feel at home, despite the distance from our place of origin.

In light of the recent referendum we have decided to embark on a collective journey, one that seeks to understand every facet of HOME. This project will be a series of essays launched with The Pigeonhole, a global book club that will bring together readers, writers and artists who want a shared experience around the following themes:

   (1) Roots, Ancestry & Tradition
One of the fastest growing hobbies in America today is the study of family ancestry. With the availability of DNA testing kits, and an ever-expanding number of genealogy websites, the average person can now trace family lines back hundreds of years. Why does the desire to know our ancestry exert such a strong hold on us? Perhaps it is a deep-seated need for differentiation or a desperate craving for a sense of belonging and wholeness? What can we learn from our ancestors, our roots and traditions?

   (2) Senses, Space & Orientation
It is said that one of the worst things that can happen to you is to lose your sense of smell. Why? Because among all our senses, one’s sense of smell provides our strongest orientation within the world we inhabit. As such we want to explore the power of our senses in providing us with a feeling of HOME.

   (3) Family as Home
Here we are looking to explore the complexities of HOME from the context of family life. What happens to our sense of home as a family expands, as we add members or when members leave? Family life involves an enormity of love, but also pride and judgement that can lend itself to feelings of confinement within the home. What makes us want to leave our families in our journey to find/create homes of our own? What is it about the journey away from home that sometimes leaves us homesick?

   (4) Migration
We are all migrants at some level. In this section we will challenge the concepts around identity, assimilation, citizenry, social inclusion/ exclusion. Migration isn’t just about geography; we all have friends who’ve migrated from one religion to another or have an auntie who married into another ethnic group. Each is a migration. What do these experiences help us to learn about ourselves?

   (5) Absence of Home
Shelter is one of our basic needs: it is a place that can protect us from the elements, keep us safe. According to Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, shelter is one of the requirements for addressing our physiological needs, along with the need for food, water air, sleep, sex. It would be interesting to investigate the human drive to create a semblance of home even under the most challenging circumstances. What makes us want to share our home, leave our home and/or escape into someone else’s? This is not only the era of refugee camps; it is also the era of coach surfing and the sharing economy.

   (6) Community & Hospitality
What does it mean to be a part of a community? What responsibility does it imply? How do we contribute to the sense of belonging to new arrivals?  Why is hospitality such a core tenet of major religions?

   (7) Borders within the Mind, Body & Spirit
There are those who claim there is a disconnect between body and mind, that the spirit is something altogether celestial. But in this age of avatars and the heightened state of self, what does it take to feel at home with oneself? How do the societal rigours affect our every day lives? What role do patriarchy and politics play in the creation of ego?

   (8) Earth as Home
There is one undeniable fact of life, and that is despite your creed, colour, gender or age, your home is on this earth. How does one become a steward of this earth? How do we scale the sensation of home to encompass the whole of the earth and its precious natural resources?

There is a large community of people out there who are as equally passionate about the issue of HOME as we are and we’d like to invite them – invite you – to be a part of our project. We are a society that lives its life through online validation. But we believe that words can change the world. Together we will bring this discussion to the fore, through serious discourse, through laughter and tears. A journey home is ultimately a journey into our humanness. And we are very thoughtful, weird and funny creatures.

For more information just take a look at the Home page. Or if you are interested in getting involved in any way then please send an email to:  anna@thepigeonhole.com





How did God know his creations would smoke marijuana?

23 02 2016

“When one starts research one never knows how it ends; you only know how you start.” – Professor Raphael Mechoulam

ANANDAMIDE: a molecule which acts as a neurotransmitter, and which has a structure very similar to that of tetrahydrocannabinol, the active constituent of cannabis. It is messenger molecule that plays a role in many bodily activities, including appetite, memory, pain, depression, and fertility – hence its name, which is derived from the word ‘ananda’ which means ‘extreme delight’ or ‘bliss’ in the Sanskrit language. Anandamide’s discovery may lead to the development of an entirely new family of therapeutic drugs.

 





tapping the spirit of wonder

13 10 2015

“There are many sides to reality. Choose the one that’s best for you. Escape into the world of imagination.”
-Daisy from Rhinoceros by Eugène Ionesco

https://gregorycolbert.com/ashes-and-snow-films.php

elephant and boy





Senses & the Self: Do we have to be stuck in our UMWELT?

24 03 2015

“I’m not really quite sure sometimes which parts of myself are doing what–is it me or is it my body?” – Anabel, age 6

The key to growth is the introduction of higher dimensions of consciousness into our awareness.  – Lao Tzu

KanizsaTriangle





Heroes of Kings Cross

3 03 2015

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Global Generation have developed land-based activities and the metaphors of ecological and cosmic processes to support building community between each other and the natural world. They work with local young people, businesses and families in King’s Cross as well as at a campsite in Wiltshire. They developed a methodology based around the three territories of ‘I, We and the Planet’ providing space for people to increase awareness of self, to connect to each other and to connect to the natural world. There are many different ways that you can get involved, whether it be volunteering, doing an internship, visiting the garden, eating at the cafe, hiring out the space for your own party or coming to one of our events. For more information, see here: http://www.globalgeneration.org.uk/ Contact generate@globalgeneration.org.uk

They also created a website to support wider outreach work with schools and other adults who want to learn about how to teach the “story of our universe” to young people as a catalyst for positive environmental and social change.

universe story

http://www.universestory.org.uk/





Beauty: Valley of Astonishment

7 12 2014

IN the middle of the journey of our life, I came to myself, in a dark wood, where the direct way was lost. – Dante 

peter brooks

http://www.visitgreece.gr/en/greeceonthespotlight/municipal_theatre_the_jewel_of_piraeus_is_open_again





BEING HUMAN: The UK’s First Humanities Festival Nov 15-23, 2014

12 09 2014

institute of philosophy

What does it mean to be human? How do we understand ourselves, our relationship to others and our place in nature? For centuries the humanities have addressed these questions. Artists, writers, philosophers, theologians and historians have considered who we are, how we live and what we value most. But are these long-standing questions changing in 2014? We are more connected than ever, yet we spend more time with smart phones and computers than face to face. The world is becoming smaller, yet the digital information we can access and store, even about ourselves, is vast and growing.  Developments in science and technology are moving fast, challenging our understanding of the self and society. What sense can we make of these changes and what challenges do we face? We need the humanities more than ever to help us address these issues and provide the means to question, interpret and explain the human predicament.

The festival is held as part of the School of Advanced Study’s 20th anniversary celebrations and draws on the success of the 2013 King’s College Festival of the Humanities. Being Human will be the UK’s first national festival of the humanities. Led by the School of Advanced Study, University of London in partnership with the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the British Academy, and universities, arts and cultural organisations across the UK, it will demonstrate the value, vitality and relevance of the humanities in 2014. Find out more at www.beinghumanfestival.org or follow the festival on Twitter at @BeingHumanFest.

http://www.sas.ac.uk/about-us/news/uk-s-first-national-humanities-festival-unveils-rich-programme-events

 

 





CREATIVITY: What do you see?

17 08 2014

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5 min in a Mom’s head

11 06 2014

What time is it? What day is it? Oh gosh this bed feels so good. Why can’t I just stay here all day. That would be the perfect vacation. Screw the Caribbean, I just want my bed. My bed with Netflix and cheesecake. And Tostitos. Guacamole, too. Mmm. Nachos. And sangria. I’ll never be skinny. Maybe I should do that Facebook ab challenge. Because I need something fresh to fail at. I should do a cheesecake challenge. Try a new cheesecake every day.

What are they fighting about? A highlighter? In a room full of toys that I paid good money for, these kids are fighting over a highlighter? Speaking of toys, I should probably wash their stuffed animals. What if they’re full of dust mites. What if there’s an entire city of dust mites right behind Tenderheart Bear’s eyes? A dust mite community with freeways and infrastructure and elected dust mite officials. I need to be more on top of this stuff. Why can’t I be a normal, responsible, Pinterest mom? I haven’t made my baby one sensory table or ice tray full of colorful little finger foods.

See rest of article by Bunmi Laditan here:
http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/5445948?ncid=fcbklnkushpmg00000037





What is REAL? asked the Rabbit

8 06 2014
velveteen rabbit
 
“What is REAL?” asked the Rabbit one day, when they were lying side by side near the nursery fender, before Nana came to tidy the room.
 
“Does it mean having things that buzz inside you and a stick-out handle?”
 
“Real isn’t how you are made,” said the Skin Horse. “It’s a thing that happens to you. When a child loves you for a long, long time, not just to play with, but REALLY loves you, then you become Real.”
 
“Does it hurt?” asked the Rabbit.
 
“Sometimes,” said the Skin Horse, for he was always truthful. “When you are Real you don’t mind being hurt.”
 
“Does it happen all at once, like being wound up,” he asked, “or bit by bit?”
 
“It doesn’t happen all at once,” said the Skin Horse. “You become. It takes a long time. That’s why it doesn’t happen often to people who break easily, or have sharp edges, or who have to be carefully kept. Generally, by the time you are Real, most of your hair has been loved off, and your eyes drop out and you get loose in the joints and very shabby. But these things don’t matter at all, because once you are Real you can’t be ugly, except to people who don’t understand.”
– The Velveteen Rabbit, by Margery Williams, Illustrated by William Nicholson
 
 
“If we cannot distinguish between a simulated and real Universe, then the question of living in a simulation is moot: this reality is ours, and it’s all we have.” – Mathew Francis
 
 
aeon is this life real
 
http://aeon.co/magazine/nature-and-cosmos/can-we-tell-if-reality-is-a-computer-simulation/
 

 





Footballers, like philosophers, need to have passion as well as intellect; they need to be a part of the game, not apart from it.

7 06 2014
 
Football is a dance, the partner is the ball. – Brazilian football coach for children.
 
Man is a goal-seeking animal. His life only has meaning if he is reaching out and striving for his goals – Aristotle
 
Football is a grand game for developing a lad physically and also morally, for he learns to play with good temper and unselfishness, to play in his place, and to play the game, and these are the best of training for any game of life.
Robert Baden-Powell
 
I love football. I love the aesthetics of football. I love the athleticism of football. I love the movement of the players, the antics of the coaches. I love the dynamism of the fans. I love their passion for their badge and the colour of their team and their country. I love the noise and the buzz and the electricity in the stadium. I love the songs. I love the way the ball moves and then it flows and the way a teams fortune rises and falls through a game and through a season. But what I love about football that it brings people together across religious divides, geographic divides, political divides. I love the fact that for ninety minutes in a rectangular piece of grass, people can forget hopefully, whatever might be going on in their life, rejoice in this communal celebration of humanity. The biggest diverse, invasive or pervasive culture that human kinds knows is football and I love the fact that at the altar of football human kind can come worship and celebrate. – Andy Harper (Former Newcastle player) 
 

a dedication to derrida

Derrida on football

Click to access PDF_Vol_06_No_01_053-63_SI_Hutchinson.pdf

 

 

 

 





LOVE = FORGIVENESS

6 06 2014





Push the Bush: The Mostar Diving Club

5 06 2014

Tonight at the Bush Hall –  the beautiful poetry of Mostar Diving Club: with Vicky Osterberg, Will Worsley, Michael G Moore and Damian Katkhuda.

 

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http://www.bushhallmusic.co.uk/





Notes & Neurons: In search of the common chorus

3 06 2014




rock-mama on tour with an infant

1 06 2014
 
“You have to be 1000% on the side of humanity once you have a kid. You’re like rooting for the home team like you never have before.”
– Efrim Menuck

Violinist Jessica Moss and singer/guitarist Efrim Menuck are struggling to balance parenthood with making music in their internationally acclaimed Montreal-based band Thee Silver Mt. Zion Memorial Orchestra. They are one of a growing number of bands to have accepted an infant/toddler into their touring life.

 

 

 





The Drake Equation

31 05 2014
 
Luna –  Mummy is ET real or not real?
Mummy – Not real. This is fiction.
Luna – I know all about about fiction and non-fiction. You know how I know that? because books are like that in the library… But does fiction mean not true at all–that none of it is true? or just a little bit not true? like when Elliot feels what ET feels ? 

In 1961, University of California, Santa Cruz, astronomer and astrophysicist Dr Frank Drake devised the Drake Equation. This controversial equation multiplied estimates of the following terms together:

The rate of formation of suitable stars.
The fraction of those stars which are orbited by planets.
The number of Earth-like worlds per planetary system.
The fraction of planets where intelligent life develops.
The fraction of possible communicative planets.
The “lifetime” of possible communicative civilisations.

Although the Drake equation currently involves speculation about unmeasured parameters, it was not meant to be science but rather intended as a way to stimulate dialogue on these topics. Then the focus becomes how to proceed experimentally. Drake used the equation to estimate that there are approximately 10,000 planets in the Milky Way galaxy containing intelligent life with the possible capability of communicating with Earth.

 





Into the Mind

25 05 2014




Day O

23 04 2014

No matter what, nobody can take away the dances you’ve already had.” – Gabriel Garcia Marquez

 

 

 

&

http://aeon.co/magazine/nature-and-cosmos/how-moon-phases-affect-life-on-earth/

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