EARTH, our HOME

13 11 2016

“There are some four million different kinds of animals and plants in the world. Four million different solutions to the problems of staying alive.” – Sir David Attenborough

 

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer





Anatomy of Illness: pessimism is a waste of time & laughter is the best cure for pain

12 11 2016

“Optimism doesn’t wait on facts. It deals with prospects. Pessimism is a waste of time.” – Norman Cousins (the man who relied on the often overlooked medication of laughter to mentally cure his condition and live to the age of 75)

 

 





For The Fallen

11 11 2016

With proud thanksgiving, a mother for her children,
England mourns for her dead across the sea.
Flesh of her flesh they were, spirit of her spirit,
Fallen in the cause of the free.

Solemn the drums thrill; Death august and royal
Sings sorrow up into immortal spheres,
There is music in the midst of desolation
And a glory that shines upon our tears.

They went with songs to the battle, they were young,
Straight of limb, true of eye, steady and aglow.
They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted;
They fell with their faces to the foe.

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.

They mingle not with their laughing comrades again;
They sit no more at familiar tables of home;
They have no lot in our labour of the day-time;
They sleep beyond England’s foam.

But where our desires are and our hopes profound,
Felt as a well-spring that is hidden from sight,
To the innermost heart of their own land they are known
As the stars are known to the Night;

As the stars that shall be bright when we are dust,
Moving in marches upon the heavenly plain;
As the stars that are starry in the time of our darkness,
To the end, to the end, they remain.

Robert Laurence Binyon, published in The Times newspaper on 21st September 1914.





Praise Him with timbrel and dancing; Praise Him with stringed instruments and pipe.

11 11 2016

Dance me to your beauty with a burning violin

Dance me through the panic ‘til I’m gathered safely in

Lift me like an olive branch and be my homeward dove

Dance me to the end of love

– Leonard Cohen

leonard_cohen_2127





anthropocene enlightenment

2 11 2016

we live in an anxious time.

by some accounts, we have less than 3 years to figure out how we will save our precious home, our earth, life as we know it.

our demise will begin in the sea just as our birth began in the sea.

we made our mistakes, created institutions and systems to support frameworks of living that we now know are completely out of sync with the natural world.

we built damns that stopped the flows of rivers, punctured the earth and extracted wealth from the depth of the Pachamama’s soul.

we took what was not ours to take.

but we are survivors.

we are survivors because we are blessed with ingenuity. we are survivors because we are creative beings. we are survivors because we have the capacity for love.

we are anti-fragile. we have the ability to see in part, but also in whole.

like the earth that sustains us, we are in a constant state of flow. sometimes churning with more turbulence than we would like, but it is only through that turbulence, through that shifting of fixed ideals and practices, that we may grow.

we expand and contract but we then expand again. a beautiful expanding universe, woven with a fabric of collective consciousness.

i close my eyes and breathe in the earth. i swallow the sea.

the scent of change penetrates my body and i am filled with longing.

i waver throughout the day between hope to despair and back to hope again.

for we have no alternative but to hope.

it is time, this is our time.

the age of man. anthropocene enlightenment.

for the love of God

our earth, ourselves.

img_0865

 

 





FOSTERing LOVE in LONDON

26 10 2016

dear friends,

what a beautiful morning it was to walk across the Millenium Bridge alongside such a warm and welcoming group of people, hearts held high and arms open wide to the children of the Calais Jungle. there is quite a lot of love in london indeed.

some have criticised the support being shown towards refugee children given the fact that there are currently 10s of thousands of British children in need of foster care too. but if we open our hearts to some, it means we are quite capable of opening our hearts to others.

who knows, maybe this is just the beginning of a new wave of foster caring across the UK.

over the last 13 months more than 10,000 members of the UK public expressed an interest in being foster carers for unaccompanied asylum seeking children. HOME for GOOD is a charity working in partnership with 12 local authorities around the country assessing and training foster carers to meet this need.

but the first step is to become a registered foster carer through your local council. here you can read about the variety of foster care schemes:

https://www.rbkc.gov.uk/sharedservices/fostering/aboutfostering/fosteringschemes.aspx  or call: 0208-753-1057

thank you love-makers Remi Olajoyegbe & Jimena Paratcha for your inspiration. we feel blessed to have been a part of Love in Action’s first campaign Have a Heart ❤️ #HaveaHeartLondon 

BIG LOVE from Philomena, Luna & Niki

fullsizerender-16 image1 image2 image3 image4 image5 image6





people in play; a sense of HOME

19 08 2016

– “How come we play war and not peace?”
– “Too few role models.”

Bill Watterson

 





a wild ride HOME

18 08 2016

“For me, HOME is somewhere I feel good and I can ride everyday.” – Thomas Genon





LONDON: everyone welcome

10 08 2016





HOME is where peace can come from

9 08 2016




PachaMama rising: HUMANO

7 08 2016

“At first they couldn’t speak to her, she had forgotten her own language… having spent 10 years on another planet, or six months on this Earth, as per our concept of space and time. Suddenly, it all came back to her. She spoke about a magical world, where people lived in harmony, and anything you wanted became real. It helps knowing that other ways of life also exist.” – Alan Stivelman (in Humano)

http://wp.me/sGFWl-home





HOME

29 06 2016

I just returned home.

Flew into London on a Bolivian tailwind in time to witness the extraordinary turn of events that have forever changed the course of history.

For the past year, I have become increasingly preoccupied with the concept of HOME; the way in which we define our borders: our continents, our countries, our communities, our families. It’s hard not to be, given the fact that there are more displaced people living in the world today than ever before in recorded history. The most recent stats coming out of the UN suggest that the number of people forcibly displaced due to war or persecution exceeds 65 million (more that the entire population of Great Britain).

These facts behind the figures simply overwhelm and it can make it difficult to think creatively about how to truly instigate change.

To find an outlet, I do what I always do: I talk to children. For years I’ve been turning to children to help shed light on age-old philosophical questions because they seem to ask the questions we grown-ups have stopped asking ourselves. I believe children return us to Plato. The conversations took place with small groups, all under the age of ten. I gave each child pen and paper and asked them to write down the first word that came to mind after I said, “HOME”.

By and large, most wrote down the words: “family”, “mummy”, “daddy”, or “house”. But when I asked the children to continue writing anything else that came to mind, there were some wonderful surprises: “ice-cream”, “bed-time”, “breakfast”, “carrots”, “football”– lots of pets’ names were listed too.

These wise young people helped me to question what really goes into the creation of a home, particularly the non-physical components. What are the smells, tastes and sounds that provide us with a sense of home? Which memories of HOME do we treasure most, and why do they hold us so tightly? What does it mean to “feel” at home (or not feel at home), irrespective of geography? Is community participation a prerequisite for claiming a sense of home? Is it possible to find a way to truly be at home with oneself? We lose loved ones, we lose our shelter from the storm, and yet we often survive this pain by tapping into a sense of home lodged deep within our ancestral past, or to the earth or to God.

Human life itself is wholly involved in the issue of finding a home, not necessarily a structure made of sturdy permanence, a bed and a roof (as Maslow may have us believe) – but rather a constant search of an essence of home. If it is an essence we pursue, rather than a structure, maybe there is hope beyond the limits of infrastructure, ways in which we can feel at home, despite the distance from our place of origin.

In light of the recent referendum we have decided to embark on a collective journey, one that seeks to understand every facet of HOME. This project will be a series of essays launched with The Pigeonhole, a global book club that will bring together readers, writers and artists who want a shared experience around the following themes:

   (1) Roots, Ancestry & Tradition
One of the fastest growing hobbies in America today is the study of family ancestry. With the availability of DNA testing kits, and an ever-expanding number of genealogy websites, the average person can now trace family lines back hundreds of years. Why does the desire to know our ancestry exert such a strong hold on us? Perhaps it is a deep-seated need for differentiation or a desperate craving for a sense of belonging and wholeness? What can we learn from our ancestors, our roots and traditions?

   (2) Senses, Space & Orientation
It is said that one of the worst things that can happen to you is to lose your sense of smell. Why? Because among all our senses, one’s sense of smell provides our strongest orientation within the world we inhabit. As such we want to explore the power of our senses in providing us with a feeling of HOME.

   (3) Family as Home
Here we are looking to explore the complexities of HOME from the context of family life. What happens to our sense of home as a family expands, as we add members or when members leave? Family life involves an enormity of love, but also pride and judgement that can lend itself to feelings of confinement within the home. What makes us want to leave our families in our journey to find/create homes of our own? What is it about the journey away from home that sometimes leaves us homesick?

   (4) Migration
We are all migrants at some level. In this section we will challenge the concepts around identity, assimilation, citizenry, social inclusion/ exclusion. Migration isn’t just about geography; we all have friends who’ve migrated from one religion to another or have an auntie who married into another ethnic group. Each is a migration. What do these experiences help us to learn about ourselves?

   (5) Absence of Home
Shelter is one of our basic needs: it is a place that can protect us from the elements, keep us safe. According to Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, shelter is one of the requirements for addressing our physiological needs, along with the need for food, water air, sleep, sex. It would be interesting to investigate the human drive to create a semblance of home even under the most challenging circumstances. What makes us want to share our home, leave our home and/or escape into someone else’s? This is not only the era of refugee camps; it is also the era of coach surfing and the sharing economy.

   (6) Community & Hospitality
What does it mean to be a part of a community? What responsibility does it imply? How do we contribute to the sense of belonging to new arrivals?  Why is hospitality such a core tenet of major religions?

   (7) Borders within the Mind, Body & Spirit
There are those who claim there is a disconnect between body and mind, that the spirit is something altogether celestial. But in this age of avatars and the heightened state of self, what does it take to feel at home with oneself? How do the societal rigours affect our every day lives? What role do patriarchy and politics play in the creation of ego?

   (8) Earth as Home
There is one undeniable fact of life, and that is despite your creed, colour, gender or age, your home is on this earth. How does one become a steward of this earth? How do we scale the sensation of home to encompass the whole of the earth and its precious natural resources?

There is a large community of people out there who are as equally passionate about the issue of HOME as we are and we’d like to invite them – invite you – to be a part of our project. We are a society that lives its life through online validation. But we believe that words can change the world. Together we will bring this discussion to the fore, through serious discourse, through laughter and tears. A journey home is ultimately a journey into our humanness. And we are very thoughtful, weird and funny creatures.

For more information just take a look at the Home page. Or if you are interested in getting involved in any way then please send an email to:  anna@thepigeonhole.com





UNfairy Tales

29 03 2016

 

 

http://edition.cnn.com/videos/world/2016/03/28/unicef-child-refugees-sesay-intv.cnn





We grow roots wherever we sow seeds

25 03 2016

Pushing the Bush with love. Oh, let the spring shine in.


  

Enormous thank you to local Angels: Daniel, Stepan and Martin. And to Kindred Spirit: Alexandra Banner. And all the friends who support Push the Bush. And especially my beloved gypsy parents who carry sunshine with them wherever they go.





FORWARD MARCH: for every 2 steps back, there is always the 1 step forward that makes all the difference

22 03 2016

Peace comes when we no longer view ideological differences as threats but conduits to growth through respectful and creative dialogue.

 http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/dec/17/us-cuba-pope-franicis-key-roles 

 





Drumpf

1 03 2016

(geo-blocked to the US.  If you’re outside, you’ll need to go through a US proxy.  Try Tunnelbear.)





otherWORLDS

27 02 2016

 
 http://youtu.be/A_Rcr9CgA9I

 
 





Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.

26 02 2016

thank you bernie.

 





How did God know his creations would smoke marijuana?

23 02 2016

“When one starts research one never knows how it ends; you only know how you start.” – Professor Raphael Mechoulam

ANANDAMIDE: a molecule which acts as a neurotransmitter, and which has a structure very similar to that of tetrahydrocannabinol, the active constituent of cannabis. It is messenger molecule that plays a role in many bodily activities, including appetite, memory, pain, depression, and fertility – hence its name, which is derived from the word ‘ananda’ which means ‘extreme delight’ or ‘bliss’ in the Sanskrit language. Anandamide’s discovery may lead to the development of an entirely new family of therapeutic drugs.

 





SOUL-seeking

23 02 2016

In a way goodness and truth seem to come out of the depths of the soul, and when we really know something we feel that we’ve always known it. Yet also it’s terribly distant, farther than any star. We’re sort of stretched out. It’s like beyond the world, not in the clouds or in heaven, but a light that shows the world, this world, as it really is.  – from Iris Murdoch’s Above the Gods

You could say ‘somebody is unhappy’; you could say this is sadness, and in a way that’s right, depending on what we mean. But if you think of this as the words of a soldier encountering the realities of the life of combat, or a refugee fleeing from such a world, or just a bereaved ‘soul’ (as we say), it seems to me that it’s more than that. Perhaps the case of depression is not really one of sadness. Is it perhaps a soul sickness? Psychiatrists, after all the word means ‘soul doctors.’ – Iain McGilchrist